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Aireys Inlet Lighthouse

Aireys Inlet

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What Can I Do

  • Other Experiences

What can't you do?  That would be a shorter list.  There are attractions, activities, events and features throughout the region to suit all ages and interest groups.  From theme parks for children to adventure sports for adrenaline junkies.  From gourmet food and wine experiences to bushwalking through campsites.  From a simple dip in the ocean to a luxurious spa retreat.  There really is something for everyone.

Things to See & Do

Family Activities

Aireys Inlet Horse Riding

Ride along pristine beaches and take in some of Australia's most beautiful coastal scenery. Sunset rides are particularly special. Enjoy the exhilarating feeling of galloping along the sand with the wind in your hair or ride along coastal cliff tops in beautiful bushland settings. Local trail riding company Blazing Saddles offers guided and instructional tours if you can’t BYO horse.

Split Point Lighthouse

The Split Point Lighthouse dominates the Aireys Inlet landscape, its 34 metre high tower and typical red cap visible for miles. The still operating lighthouse is open to the public with guided tours available and sweeping views of the Eagle Rock Marine Sanctuary and Great Ocean Road region below. The grounds surrounding the lighthouse include a replica of the ‘bark hut’ early settlers in Aireys Inlet would have lived in, and the beach at the base of the lighthouse has great rockpools to explore.

Painkalac Creek Playground

The Painkalac Creek playground is set in a picturesque location, with views to the Split Point Lighthouse. This reserve adjoins Aireys Inlet Skate Park and is ideal for a family picnic or BBQ. There is plenty of open space for game of cricket, a kick of the footy or flying kites. Aireys Inlet has two other playgrounds located at the Community Centre and the Bark Hut Reserve.

Anglesea Art Walk

Spanning 2.5 kilometres and featuring six mosaic art pieces, the Anglesea Art Walk highlights the history and unique flora and fauna of this extraordinary place. It starts at the JE Loveridge lookout with sensational panoramic views of the Surf Coast and concludes in the valley at the Anglesea Primary School.

Coogarah Park

Popular with families for its shipwreck playground, BBQ facilities and picnic areas, Coogarah Park set on the riverbank just a couple of minutes from the centre of town provides the children with hours of entertainment. There are also walking tracks and a skate park in the grounds.

Cape Otway Lightstation

Climb to the top of mainland Australia's oldest lighthouse, Cape Otway Lightstation, 90 metres above the wild Southern Ocean, and see why many tragic shipwrecks occurred on this isolated and rugged coastline. Immerse yourself in history with one of Australia's most important and recognisable lighthouses at your doorstep. Spectacular scenery, lighthouse tours, wildlife (koalas, wallabies and whales), rainforests, waterfalls and awesome sunsets will be highlights of your stay. Cape Otway is an excellent location to base yourself, being central to Great Ocean Road and Great Otway National Park activities and walks. Groups of up to 16 people can be accommodated in the heritage Head Lighthouse Keeper's cottage with four bedrooms, two bathrooms, open fires and fully self contained kitchen and laundry facilities. Two night minimum stays. The cottage is a wonderful retreat for families, walking groups or as a unique venue for get-togethers with friends. The Manager's House is a fully self-contained, newly renovated property providing all the comforts of home, comfortably accommodating up to 15 guests. A great location for a house party, or place to relax after walking in the Otways, the Manager's House is filled with natural light. Both properties have bed and breakfast options for smaller groups or couples. The Lightstation also has a delightful café on site which is open daily. Relax over a great coffee and homemade scones, soaking up the views. The café is located in the original Assistant Lighthouse Keeper's cottage, right in front of the lighthouse. Discover the coast on a 4WD Lightkeeper's Shipwreck Discovery Tour, which runs daily and with special offers for accommodation guests. Walk in the footsteps of lightkeepers and pioneers along the Great Ocean Walk with experienced and knowledgeable local guides. Opera in the Otways - Saturday November 17, 2012 - see website for details.
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Theatre, Music and the Arts

Eagles Nest Gallery

Situated in the picturesque township of Aireys Inlet, the charm of this town lies in its quiet bushland setting and spectacular beaches along the Great Ocean Road, the gateway to the iconic Twelve Apostles. Aireys Inlet is also the home of the Split Point Lighthouse and the quiet relaxing nature of the setting is a wonderful source of inspiration for many artists and writers. Eagles Nest Fine Art Gallery prides itself on showcasing the works of established and emerging artists from the Geelong/Otway region, many of whom live in the local area.

Golf

Anglesea Golf Club

The Anglesea Golf Club is situated on the Great Ocean Road and is an undulating 6,074 metre Par 73 layout set in natural bushland. A feature of the course is the number of elevated greens that require plenty of thought when selecting your club. There are only 42 bunkers throughout the course which have been likened to sand-belt bunkers and coupled with eucalypt tree lined fairways combine to produce a stimulating round. Also there is the ever present resident population of Eastern Grey Kangaroos which number approximately 300. Anglesea Golf Club welcomes social golfers and social groups every day of the week, don't have golf equipment? The Pro Shop carries hire clubs, pull buggies and motorised carts. There are green fees with cheaper rates for group bookings, juniors and nine holes. If you are not interested in golf why not come along and have lunch or dinner in the Bistro over looking the 18th hole with ocean glimpses. The Bistro is open for lunch daily and dinner nightly. The kangaroos generally come down towards the Clubhouse of an evening so visitors having a drink on the balcony or dining in our bistro have the unique experience of seeing Australian Wildlife in a natural setting.

The Surf Coast Walk

Split Point Lighthouse Tours Aireys Inlet

You'll spot her as you travel the Great Ocean Road. To locals and fans afar she is affectionately known as 'The White Queen'. Don't just wonder as you drive by - yes, you can join a guided tour, which will take about 45 minutes of your time. The knowledgeable tour guide will introduce you to a life of maritime responsibility, engineering perfection, a pristine Marine Sanctuary, cultural connections, the famous setting for the TV series 'Round the Twist' and ever-changing 360 degree coastal vistas. Whether you want to step back in maritime, forward in coastal conservation or capture the now with a perfect snapshot, this is a stop worth every minute. The Split Point Lighthouse was built in 1891 and has only been open for tours for eighteen months. She still shines her guiding light every evening to keep ships passing on their way to and from Port Phillip Bay, off the rocky shores. The staff at Split Point Lighthouse Tours look forward to guiding you up the cast iron spiral staircase, through the lantern room and out onto the balcony to enjoy a birds-eye view of the dramatic coastline.

10. Sunnymead

Urquhart Bluff to Sunnymead Take a walk on the wild side through rugged coastal bushland in Great Otway National Park. Rediscover remnants of the original Great Ocean Road and find yourself in a secluded cove at Sunnymead. DISTANCE: 3 km GRADE: 4 NOTES: Rough track, rugged steps, beach sand surfaces.

11. Aireys Clifftops

Sunnymead to Aireys Lighthouse This easy walk, on a well-made track, is a favourite of locals. Treat yourself to stunning land'™s edge views as you transition between beach, bush and the Aireys Inlet township. Listen for the song of Rufous Bristlebirds and look for tiny marsupials as they scurry in the low coastal scrubland. DISTANCE: 2.8 km GRADE: 2 NOTES: Well formed, narrow track, gentle hills, no steps.

12. Lighthouse Discovery

Aireys Lighthouse to Fairhaven Discovery stroll from the Split Point Lighthouse and lookouts, past whale sighting spots, through traditional Wathaurung country. Cross an ancient tribal boundary to the western reach of the Surf Coast Walk. Learn as you go with the insights of the Lighthouse Discovery Trail and several well-signed viewing platforms. DISTANCE: 2.1 km GRADE: 2 NOTES: Well formed track, few steps, gentle hills.

Adventure

Eagle Rock Marine Sanctuary

At the base of the Split Point Lighthouse, the 17 hectare Eagle Rock Marine Sanctuary is home to a huge variety of marine life. Popular with snorkellers and scuba divers, you can expect to see a diverse range of invertebrates. The rockpools around the sandy coves in this area are also teeming with marine life and are terrific for families to explore.

Fairhaven Surf Life Saving Club

The 6 km long Fairhaven Beach is the longest beach on the Great Ocean Road. The Fairhaven Surf Life Saving Club, founded in 1957, is located toward the eastern end of the beach - and its members average 10 rescues annually. The bar and restaurant are open during the summer months.

Anglesea Riverbank

A series of flowing channels connected by bike paths and bridges make Anglesea River a popular destination for activities such as fishing from one of the many platforms, canoeing, windsurfing, sailing or hiring a paddle boat. The wide river is ideal for numerous activities to suit all ages. The many bbq’s and tables along the riverbank also make it an ideal picnic area. The river and its surroundings is also an important habitat for native wildlife including owls, possums, echidnas, kangaroo and wallabies, as well as native fish, eels and many species of waterbird.

Beaches

Fairhaven Beach

Six kilometre long Fairhaven Beach is the longest beach on the Great Ocean Road, from which it is readily accessible, as the road backs the entire beach. The beach runs due west from the mouth of Moggs Creek for 4 km, before slowly curving around to face east at the western Cinema Point. The southerly aspect exposes the beach to waves averaging 1.5 m, which combine with the fine to medium beach sand to produce a 200 m wide surf zone containing two bars. The inner bar is cut by rips every 300 m, resulting in up to 20 rips along the beach. The outer bar, which only breaks in higher waves, has more widely spaced rips, when it is active. The Fairhaven Surf Life Saving Club, founded in 1957, is located toward the eastern end of the beach, and its members annually average 10 rescues. Swimming A potentially hazardous beach, with usually moderate waves and persistent and often strong rips. Westerly winds intensify longshore and rip currents. Stay in the patrolled area on the attached inner bar. Surfing The beach has numerous beach breaks and usually a good swell. However, it is exposed and works best with northerly winds. Some well-known spots along the beach include the mouth of Moggs Creek, where low summer lefts can be found; The Spot, a reef break just east of the surf lifesaving club; and further down at Eastern View and Spouts Creek. Fishing The good access and numerous rips and holes make this a popular, although usually uncrowded, spot for beach fishing. The mouths of Moggs and Spout Creeks are also popular, when they are flowing. General A long, natural beach more suited to experienced bathers and surfers, with the patrolled area in front of the surf club offering the safest bathing area. Toward the western end of the beach is a Memorial Arch commemorating the construction of the Great Ocean Road during the depression years of the 1930s. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 100 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 7 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Cinema Point Beach

At Cinema Point, the winding, cliff hanging section of the Great Ocean Road begins. Cinema Point is a 30 m high, grassy knoll, backed by the road and surrounded by sandstone rock platforms. There are two small beaches here, one on either side. The eastern one is below the car park and viewing area immediately behind the knoll. It is 50 m long, faces east, is backed by road fill and the knoll, and is dominated by platforms and reefs. On the western side of the point is the main beach, that occupies the deep gully carved by Grassy Creek. It consists of a veneer of sand over rock platforms. Both beaches receive waves averaging about 1 m and have a surf zone entirely dominated by rocks and reefs. Swimming Be very careful if bathing here, as permanent rip currents drain out from both reefs, and rocks and reefs abound in the surf. Surfing The north side of Cinema Rocks is known as Hunters or Shark Alley. It has a moderate right hander during big swell. Fishing The extensive rock platforms at low tide provide good access to the rock gullies on either side of the point. General A favourite viewing site, with the beaches used by surfers and fishers, but unsuitable for safe bathing. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 15 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarentee that all translations will be accurate. General Beach Hazard Rating: 5 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Aireys Inlet Beach

Aireys Inlet is a holiday settlement spread for 3 km along the back of the bluffs, on the north side of the actual Aireys Inlet. Below the bluffs is a series of small, south-east to south facing beaches. The only readily accessible beach is Aireys Inlet Beach (322), which is located at the mouth of a gully. It has a small car park, and steps down to the beach from the end of Eagle Rock Parade. The beach is 500 m long, and is bordered by 20 m high headlands and rock platforms composed of red sandstone. Bluffs are eroding along the back of the beach, particularly the southern 300 m, which is a narrow strip of sand awash at high tide. The surf zone is 50 m wide, with a permanent rip against the northern rocks. Aireys Inlet South Beach (323) is a small, 50 m pocket of sand fronted by reefs. It is located below 30 m high bluffs and is essentially inaccessible. Swimming Aireys Inlet Beach has the best access in the area and is primarily used by the locals. However, it is a hazardous beach with a strong rip feeder current running along the beach and a rip running out past the headland. Take care if swimming here. Surfing There are beach breaks over the bars and southern reefs. Fishing The rock platform at the north end provides the best location to fish the permanent rip channel. General A popular beach with the locals, but one requiring caution. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 10 General Beach Hazard Rating: 6 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life.

Urquhart Bluff Beaches

The 5 km of coast between Urquhart Bluff and Table Rock at Fairhaven is dominated by 20 to 50 m high, eroding bluffs composed of poorly consolidated limestone, tuffs, clays and silts. As they erode, they leave inter- and sub-tidal rock platforms and reefs. Running along the base of the bluffs are twelve small, exposed beaches, mostly dominated by the headlands, rocks and reefs. The first five face south-east and extend from Urquhart Bluff south-west for 1 km. They can be reached at low tide around the rocks from Urquhart Bluff, or by climbing down some of the less steep bluffs. They are all exposed to waves averaging 1.3 m, but owing to the degree of protection or the presence of rocks and reefs, they have variable beaches and surf zones. Urquhart Bluff South Beach (315) is 200 m long and has a wide, shallow surf zone with a permanent rip against the southern headland and reef. Swimming These are five hazardous beaches, owing to their relatively remote location and access ranging from difficult to dangerous. This is coupled with the presence of rocks, reefs and permanent rips. Surfing Moderate swells and a high tide produce right hand breaks over some of the reefs, most of which can be viewed from the top of Urquhart Bluff. Fishing Each of these beaches has good permanent rip holes and reef gutters. The biggest problem is access. Be very careful at high tide and in bigger seas, as the rocks and some of the beaches are awash. General Five beaches dominated by the bluffs, rocks and reefs. Carpark Type: Formal parking area Spaces: 10 SLSA provides this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. SLSA reminds you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches. SLSA takes all care and responsibility for any translation but it cannot guarantee that all translations will be accurate.

Bells Beach

With an international reputation as one of Australia’s best surf beaches, Bells Beach is amazing spot – either in the water or out. There isn’t much ‘beach’ at Bells, it’s mostly a glorious cliff-face, and views from the cliff-top car park are spectacular – a great spot to watch local surfers out in the water. There are several quality surfing spots in the precinct from Southside to Steps Reef. Every Easter Bells Beach hosts the international professional surfing community for the Rip Curl Pro event. To get to Bells Beach, travel along the Great Ocean Road past Jan Juc – turn left into Bells Boulevard and follow the signs. General Beach Hazard Rating: 6 Least hazardous: 1-3 Moderately hazardous: 4-6 Highly hazardous: 7-8 Extremely hazardous: 9-10 Hazard rating refers to physical beach and surf conditions ONLY and does not include potentially dangerous marine life. SURFING Bells is a world class right when above 1.5 m. When smaller, the waves break close in to the headland and produce a right called Rincon. Further around the head are two more reef breaks which work below 2 m, called Centre Side (a right) and Southside (a left). FISHING The water is deep right off the beach, while at low tide you can fish from the reefs at each end. GENERAL One of the meccas of surfing and well worth a visit, if only to view the beach and surf from the bluffs. CARPARK Type: Formal parking area Surface: Sealed Spaces: 200 We provide this information as a guide only. Surf conditions are variable and therefore this information should not be relied upon as a substitute for observation of local conditions and an understanding of your abilities in the surf. We remind you to always swim between the red and yellow flags and never swim at unpatrolled beaches.

Great Ocean Road Journey

Great Ocean Road Memorial Archway

Built as a tribute to the soldiers from the First World War who were engaged in the construction of the Great Ocean Road, the memorial arch provides a great photographic opportunity for travellers entering Lorne. Alongside the arch is a sculpture also commemorating the returned servicemen, which was commissioned and placed during the 75th anniversary of the road celebrations. There is a carpark alongside this area so visitors can make the most of this photo opportuniy.

Erskine Falls and Straw Falls

Car park options - Erskine Falls car park (300m return walk to falls 1st lookout, 700 m to 2nd lookout) Walking track information (Erskine River Track) - Start: Erskine Falls car park - Finish: Lorne - Distance: 7.5 km one way - Duration: 3 hours - Difficulty: Strenuous Details Erskine Falls is a short drive out of Lorne on appropriately named Erskine Falls Road. It is one of the most popular falls in the Otways and easily accessible. A five-minute walk from the car park brings you to a lookout of the falls, cascading 30 metres into a beautiful tree fern gullyYou also can take steps down to the Erskine River to view the falls from below. . Straw Falls are a 15m cascade on the Erskine River and are a further 400m downstreams of Erskine Falls. Experienced walkers can follow the river from Erksine Falls to Lorne. The 7.5km one-way walk takes about three hours and passes Straw Falls and Splitter Falls. It should not be attempted when water levels are high.

Anglesea Heath

Superb native flowers and rare orchids bloom in the coastal heathlands during spring. Amazingly, over a quarter of Victoria’s plant species grow here including more than 100 varieties of orchids, some of them so rare they are on the verge of extinction. Many vehicle tracks and walking trails offer photographers, walkers, artists and bird watchers great viewing opportunities.

Outdoor Activities

Airey's Inlet Walks

The walks around Aireys Inlet include short, easy walks, such as those around the Lighthouse Precinct or the nature walks at Distillery Creek and Moggs Creek picnic areas. There are also longer, more strenuous walks such as the Currawong Falls Circuit. There are also walks along clifftops and beaches with spectacular views along the coast & Otway Ranges.

Museums, History and Heritage

Aireys Inlet Bark Hut

The 1983 Ash Wednesday bushfires destroyed the original building which had stood since 1857. The current building, a loving recreation, is an interesting replica of the kind of early homestead in the area. The Bark Hut is located in the Allan Noble Sanctuary off the Great Ocean Road.

Surf World Museum

The Surf World Museum in Torquay, Australia’s surfing capital, celebrates the story of surfing. It also charts Australia’s significant contribution to the development of surfing around the world. Through the colourful and exciting permanent displays and temporary exhibitions of important surfing artefacts and memorabilia, the museum commemorates Australia’s fantastic surfing heritage and rich beach culture. An unforgettable experience, Surf World provides the opportunity to immerse yourself in one of Australia’s most popular pastimes. It’s a place where you can experience or relive, surfing’s sense of fun, and marvel at the changes that have taken place over the years. We look forward to welcoming you.

Food & Wine

Aireys Inlet Shopping

There are two small but distinct commercial centres in town - one in the north, including a general store, post office and a couple of food outlets. A slightly larger centre is located just east of Painkalac Creek, featuring fashion outlets and more eateries (fish and chips, cafes, ice creameries and more).

St Anne's Vineyard

St Anne's Vineyards is a family owned wine company that was established some 30 years ago in the Pentland Hills at Myrniong, Southern Victoria. Since its humble beginnings, the company has expanded and seen substantial vineyard development at Perricoota, Moama Southern NSW. St Anne's Myrniong Vineyard was established by Allan & Shirley McLean in 1972. The extremely cool climate and high annual rainfall combine to form premium viticultural conditions. The vineyard at Myrniong is low yielding producing premium cool quality fruit. Located 200km North of Myrniong, 250km Melbourne, St Anne's Perricoota Vineyards were established in 1994 by Allan and Shirley McLean. The ideal growing conditions combined with modern viticulture techniques are combined to produce premium quality fruit and in turn, premium quality wine. The 21st century has seen St Anne's management passed down to second-generation family members seeking broader horizons and new challenges. We invite you to sample our product.

Dinny Goonan Wines

Dinny Goonan Wines is one of a handful of families pioneering grape and wine production in the Otway hinterland. Their wines have won numerous awards since the first commercial release in 2001. The vineyard and cellar door are conveniently situated on the inland road to Lorne, between Winchelsea and Deans Marsh. This location provides a great springboard to explore the Otways and surrounding attractions, and they are happy to share some local knowledge of other places to see and visit. Visitors are welcome to taste their wines and relax in the peaceful vineyard setting. You can find out more about the wines by talking to Dinny the winemaker, or stroll around the vineyard and winery. Vineyard platters are available on weekends between November and April and every day during January, so it is a great chance to take some time out to enjoy the wines, surrounded by the vines that produced them. The platters have a regional focus providing the opportunity to match local wines with regional produce. The only distractions will come from the Crimson Rosellas and Blue Winged Grass Parrots that have made the vineyard their home. They also offer a great coffee and a selection of local foodstuffs and oils. And then of course, there are their award winning wines. As a family run enterprise, everything is very much "hands on". The vines are hand pruned; they pick the grapes by hand and use traditional vinification and elevage techniques within the modern winery. They specialize in the production of cool climate Shiraz and Riesling. They also produce limited quantities of Cabernets (a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot and Malbec), a Semillon/Sauvignon and a Sparkling wine (a blend of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay) which are available exclusively to their cellar door customers.

Geelong Wine Region

Whether it is the distinctive maritime flavours of The Bellarine, the ancient richness of the Moorabool Valley Wine Region or the rugged, exposed coastline of the Surf Coast, the Geelong Wine Region is united by boutique, family owned winegrowers producing premium quality hand crafted wines. With each sub region and winery displaying their own unique characteristics, visitors are invited to explore the diversity of the Geelong Wine Region's stunning scenery, touring routes and restaurants whilst sampling some of Victoria's finest cellar door experiences. Geelong's family owned boutique operators maximise their wine's potential by hand pruning, hand picking and hand crafting their wines allowing regional characters to develop. Areas within the region have varying microclimates influencing the depth of colour, bouquet and flavour of the wines. The Bellarine has a maritime climate with bay breeezes and spectacular views, whilst the hills and valleys of the Moorabool Valley – Anakie areas have a warm, continental style climate. The renowned Surf Coast is famous for its long summer days and cooling ocean breezes. James Halliday in his Wine Atlas of Australia and New Zealand wrote: "If there is a unifying feature in all of the Geelong wines, it is their strength and depth of colour, bouquet and flavour." Not only does the Geelong wine region produce some of Australia's best wines, but the wineries are surrounded by some of Victoria's best scenery and touring opportunities. The Geelong Wine Region. Fine wines – from our hands to yours. For a map of the winery region visit: http://www.winegeelong.com.au/wine_region/map

Surfing

Surf Torquay

Torquay lives and breathes surfing, and the region has a global reputation as an amazing surf destination. Bells Beach hosts the annual Rip Curl Pro, where the best surfers in the world compete each Easter. Nearby Winkipop is also popular with experienced surfers. Torquay and Jan Juc offer good conditions for those wanting to learn to surf, and several schools operate classes at local beaches. Surf conditions can vary greatly, check with the Visitor Information Centre or local Surf Life Saving Club.

Cycling

Anglesea Mountain Bike Riding

Anglesea has become well known for its fantastic mountain bike tracks. The state of the art Anglesea Bike Park has over 500m of mountain cross and jump tracks and will provide challenges for novice and experienced riders alike. Surrounding the bike park is a series of trails ideal for cross country mountain biking. It is located in Camp Road, Anglesea and is open daily.

Ride Forrest

Forrest is one of Australia's best mountain bike destinations. With over 60 kilometres of purpose built single track, there is more than three days of riding here. You can stay in a variety of accommodation options and ride right from your front door of your accommodation. Forrest is the gateway to the Otways, with places to stay, eat and ride. Platypus tours are also available. Visit the Ride Forrest website to find all you need to know about Forrest and Mountain Bike riding in the Otways.

You Yangs

Rising from the flat, volcanic plains between Geelong and Melbourne, the granite peaks of the You Yangs are a terrific destination for many outdoor activities. Walk to Flinders Peak for panoramic views of Geelong, Corio Bay, the Western Districts and beyond. There are several walking tracks within the park catering for varying abilities. The You Yangs are popular for mountain biking; the two designated mountain bike areas offer 50km of track. The park is also popular for rock climbing, abseiling and horse riding and there are BBQ and picnic areas available, as well as toilets.

Markets & Shopping

Anglesea Shopping

There is a shopping strip in Anglesea with the regulation variety of specialty shops as well as supermarkets, food outlets and services. The Riverbank provides eateries & galleries with a river view, near the main beach are the surf schools and hire shops. There are also galleries featuring local art and several tour operators, activities and equipment hire shops in the vicinity.

Torquay Shopping

As birth place and headquarters for some of the biggest surf brands in Australia, Torquay is a destination for shopping. The main highway into town has shops and plazas, including the large Surf City Plaza, on either side of the road. Every name in surfwear and adventure sports apparel is featured in the precinct. Many of the brands also have factory outlets nearby. As a vibrant and modern seaside destination, Torquay has a number of other shopping precincts. Gilbert Street is considered the centre of town, with supermarkets, bakeries, post office and banks as well as specialty retail and eateries. Torquay Central is a plaza development housing some of Australia’s best known retailers alongside coffee shops and places to eat. Bell Street has a collection of shops, cafes and restaurants as well as the local pub. Some tour operators and learn to surf schools operate from offices in Bell Street.

Romantic Getaway & Weddings

Saltair Spa

Only one hour from the Westgate Bridge you will find Saltair Spa. Situated in a unique location, offering stunning views of Torquay's rolling hills and crystal blue waters. Calm your mind as you are cared for by the exceptional therapists and Indulge in a complete menu of day spa treatments and therapies. Derma-Cosmeceuticals Skincare is available using the latest Multi-spectrum imaging. Try something new like an Indigenous Inspired Rhythmic Massage or a Facial Treatment using a combination of the purist organic bases and pure oxygen gas. Captivate your senses while your stresses melt away in the Hydrotherapy Spa, Geisha Spa, Vichy Shower or Steam Sauna. Saltair treatments use only the highest quality aromatherapy oils, earth ochres, desert salts, ocean mineral polishers, moisturisers and elixirs used in the finest destination spas worldwide. Saltair Spa uses and recommends Li'Tya Spa products. Capturing the potency of indigenous Australian plants, fruits, earth ochres, desert salts and sea plants, with each product depicting the wonder and beauty of the country. Li'Tya offers exquisitely pure health, beauty and wellbeing treatments - individually tailored to energise and beautify every part of your being. Saltair Spa also use and recommend Heritage Healers facial treatments. Pure oxygen gas, in conjunction with vitamins and minerals, is used to nourish and revitalise the skin cells. With Heritage Healers O2 Oxygen Therapy they soothe away internal stress, then regenerate and boost the health of every skin cell with pure oxygen gas, plus essential vitamins and minerals. It is the most effective skin treatment program of its kind, designed to cleanse, nourish and revitalise every skin cell of the face, pore by pore. Choose from body treatments, geisha tub, hydrotherapy, massage, facials, oxygen treatments, hand and foot treatments, Day Spa packages and Professional Skin Health Advice and treatments, spray tans, waxing and tinting.
 

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Packages & Offers

BIG 4 Beacon Resort Blues Train Package

A unique musical experience! Toe tapping entertainment, a cool drink and a good laugh. Rock your stay in Queenscliff with Blues Train tickets and award winning accommodation at BIG4 Beacon Resort.

Seahaven Village - Taste of The Bellarine $495

Relax at stunning Barwon Heads Friday and Saturday night in a cosy 4.5 star one bedroom spa suite.

Barwon Heads Golf Club - Winter Escape with Free Golf

$240 per couple per night

BIG 4 Beacon Resort Blues Train Package

A unique musical experience! Toe tapping entertainment, a cool drink and a good laugh. Rock your stay in Queenscliff with Blues Train tickets and award winning accommodation at BIG4 Beacon Resort.

Phone: 1800 351 152 or visit BIG4 Beacon Resort Website for more information.
 

Seahaven Village - Taste of The Bellarine $495

Relax at stunning Barwon Heads Friday and Saturday night in a cosy 4.5 star one bedroom spa suite. Enjoy fabulous bonuses including:

  • A $70 dinner voucher
  • Welcome pack including wine, chocolates and a breakfast basket
Stay between Sunday and Thursday nights and receive THREE nights accommodation for the same price.

T: 03 5254 1066
 

Barwon Heads Golf Club - Winter Escape with Free Golf

This winter, guests who book a standard room at our normal Bed and Breakfast rate play golf for free. Want an even better reason to take a break? The Club is rated one of Australia’s Top 10 public access courses.

From $240 per room per night.
($120 p/p twin share)

  • Accommodation in a standard room with ensuite at Barwon Heads Golf Club
  • Fully cooked breakfast
  • A complimentary round of golf each person (normally up to $85 each).

Address: Golf Links Rd, Barwon Heads, Victoria 3227

To book:

Phone: 03 5255 6255
Fax: 03 5255 6266
Website: www.bhgc.com.au
Email: reservations@bhgc.com.au

T&C's: Valid Sunday to Thursday inclusive. 1st June to 31 August 2014. Dress requirements apply on course and in the clubhouse.
 

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